Revolution has become popular on our games nights. A nice easy-to-play game with fiendish tactics.

Revolution-Steve Jackson Game. We like it and it only takes an hour

Boardgamegeek revues this game well. We like it. In Revolution, you can: Blackmail the printer. Threaten the innkeeper. Bribe the priest. Welcome to Revolution!

Secretly bid against your opponents to gain victory points, control territories (worth victory points at the end of the game) and collect more Gold, Blackmail, and Force tokens for the next round of bidding! Will you try to control the tavern or the fortress? The harbour or the plantation? Knowing where to push for points – and where to back away and let your opponents fight – is the key to victory. Whoever has the most victory points at the end of the game wins. It’s a game of bluff, counter-bluff, and surprise!

Bidding tokens have different shapes and colours for easy identification. Colourful cardstock shields keep your bids private and also provide a handy rules reference during the auction. Brightly coloured wooden blocks allow players to see, at a glance, who controls which colonial-themed territories.

Revolution! is for three or four players. The rules can be taught in minutes, and a complete game takes less than an hour. Each new game lets players find new strategies and tactics.

 

 

 

Catan-Ancient Egypt-A suprisingly good variant. We gave it it a go.

Catan-Ancient Egypt brings The Settlers of Catan to a new location and time, with players now living in the time of the Pharaohs and using their ox carts to move resources to build small villages and great temples styled after some of the most interesting buildings of Egyptian antiquity. As always, you must beware of the robber! His chariot can interrupt production at your cattle pastures, papyrus groves and quarries. You will need boats to cross the Nile and instead of roads you get bullock carts.

After you master the base game, you can try these variants:

  • H: Ten god cards are now available to player, with their powers adding a variety of options for dynamic gameplay.
  • T: Players can now build and move papyrus boats across the Nile to compete for the pharaoh’s blessing and the vizier’s favor by building blocks onto the great pyramid

The help from Gods cards set a new aspect which can give you an edge. We liked these. The Great Pyramid gives one extra victory points and other extras. It was a tight game. We recommend it.

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Castellan-Building courtyards

We tried out Castellan last Thursday. You build wall and towers to make courtyards which wins you points. It’s fast-play; about 45 mins. It’s a simple rule system hides the complicated tactics and player interplay that arises to get ahead. We all liked the game. Boardgamegeek says:

In Castellan, two players work together to build a castle. Finely detailed wall and tower pieces link together to form courtyards, and the player who finishes a courtyard claims it with a Keep, scoring points for that courtyard equal to the number of tower pieces surrounding it.

In more detail, each player starts the game with two decks of cards: a wall deck and a tower deck. Each card allows a player to play the components shown on it, with the wall deck cards always depicting at least one wall (and some combination of walls/towers) and the tower deck cards always depicting at least one tower (and again some combination of walls/towers). On a turn, a player can play as many cards as she wants, but she draws only one card at the end of her turn. The goal is to create courtyards – and subdivide existing courtyards – while keeping your opponent from doing the same. It’s a good game.

 

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Keyflower by R&D games.

A player has introduced us to a new game Keyflower. It was well-received.

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Keyflower is a game for two to six players played over four rounds. Each round represents a season: spring, summer, autumn, and finally winter. Each player starts the game with a “home” tile and an initial team of eight workers, each of which is colored red, yellow, or blue. Workers of matching colors are used by the players to bid for tiles to add to their villages. Matching workers may alternatively be used to generate resources, skills and additional workers, not only from the player’s own tiles, but also from the tiles in the other players’ villages and from the new tiles being auctioned.

In spring, summer and autumn, more workers will arrive on board the Keyflower and her sister boats, with some of these workers possessing skills in the working of the key resources of iron, stone and wood. In each of these seasons, village tiles are set out at random for auction. In the winter no new workers arrive and the players select the village tiles for auction from those they received at the beginning of the game. Each winter village tile offers VPs for certain combinations of resources, skills and workers. The player whose village and workers generate the most VPs wins the game.

Breakthrough: Cambrai-November 1917

We are trying out “Breakthrough: Cambrai” this Thursday. This is and area movement system and we have had one game already and are ready to give it another go now we have got a hold of some of the rules. Welcome to November 1917.

Breakthrough: Cambrai is two player game simulating the British assault to breach the “Hindenburg Line” between November 20 and December 3, 1917. One player controls the British forces, the other the German forces. The object of the game is to control a certain number of areas on the map or, for the British, to exit units off the map into certain perimeter zones says Boardgame geek.

The game impulse uses mechanics and area movement (where players alternate “mini-turns”) similar to popular games like Breakout: Normandy, Storm over Arnhem, Cassino, Turning point: Stalingrad and Monty’s Gamble: Market Garden.

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Diamant-Go down the mines and get jewels.

Four stars on Boardgamegeek. Diamant is a quick, fun game of push-your-luck. Players venture down mine shafts by turning up cards from a deck, sharing the gems they find on the way down. Before the next card is turned up, you have the chance to leave the mine and stash your finds, including any gems you get on the way out.

Why would you leave? Because the deck also contains hazards, scorpions, snakes, poison gases, explosions and rockfalls. When a duplicate hazard turns up (such as a second scorpion), anyone left in the shaft has to flee for safety and loses all the gems they got this turn. The trick is, the more players that leave, the bigger your share in the next card will be. Published in 2005. We started playing it again. 15 minutes a game. A good family game also.

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K2. A mountain climbing game

First published in 2010 this boardgame is becoming popular. It had its first run out at the Headingley Games Club last week and was well-liked. Its one of a series; Mount Everest, K2, and Broad Peak. It has won awards for its strategy game play.

Boardgamegeek says “K2 is a board game in which each player controls a team of 2 mountaineers, trying to climb to the summit of K2 and return before the other players’ teams and before the mountain kills them. Every player uses an identical deck of cards. You use the cards to move your climbers on the route pictured on the gaming board, or to acclimatize the members of your team.
You can also set up a tent and wait for better weather. You will have to choose your path carefully, as the other mountaineers can block your way, and watch the upcoming weather which can lower your acclimatization to 0, thus killing your climbers.”

Looks good

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