Agricola-Build your farm- with Farmers of the Moor

Last week we tried Agricola with the The Farmers of the Moor option. This expansion adds to the base game with a large set of new improvements, and adds a number of new features. Horses are introduced as a new type of animal. In addition, you not only have to feed your family, but you must keep them from becoming “ill” by heating each room in your house. You can get fuel to heat your home by chopping down the forests on your farmyard, or by harvesting peat. In Agricola, you’re a farmer in a wooden shack with your spouse and little else. On a turn, you get to take only two actions, one for you and one for the spouse, from all the possibilities you’ll find on a farm: collecting clay, wood, or stone; building fences; and so on. You might think about having kids in order to get more work accomplished, but first you need to expand your house. First published 2007 this Agricola has become an award-winning game. Boardgamegeek reviews it highly. The game at the Headingley Games Club was one of many. The five players had close results-22, 40, 41, 42 and 44 points.

 

Agric

Farmers

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Agricola-Build your farm- One the most popular multi-player board games.

In Agricola, you’re a farmer in a wooden shack with your spouse and little else. On a turn, you get to take only two actions, one for you and one for the spouse, from all the possibilities you’ll find on a farm: collecting clay, wood, or stone; building fences; and so on. You might think about having kids in order to get more work accomplished, but first you need to expand your house. First published 2007 this Agricola has become an award-winning game. Boardgamegeek reviews it highly. The game at the Headingley Games Club was one of many. The five players had close results-22, 40, 41, 42 and 44 points.

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A good turnout for the first Games night of the New Year

A good turnout at the club last night for the first Thursday of the New Year. Plenty of interesting games played. Carcassonne with variants, Puerto Rico, Agricola, DBMM, Warhammer 40k, Dark Heresy and others were out for a run.
 
A good turnout of players
A good turnout of players

       

A range of the games that are being played
A range of the games that are being played

Ora et Labora takes off.

Two tables were playing Ora et Labora last week. Its becoming popular and is highly rated on boardgame geek. The game has won many rewards over the past year. In Ora et Labora, each player is head of a monastery in the Medieval era who acquires land and constructs buildings – little enterprises that will gain resources and profit. The goal is to build a working infrastructure and manufacture prestigious items – such as books, ceramics, ornaments, and relics – to gain the most victory points at the end of the game.  Some spaces start with trees or moors on them, as in Agricola: Farmers of the Moor, so they hinder development until a player clears the land. I never knew monks could be such fun.

Ora et labore-spiel de Jahre 2012

Ora et labore-spiel de Jahre 2012-A Le Havre style game from Z man games was played last Thursday at the Headingley games club. Spiel de Jahre (game of the Year) is a high award for a game and takes up to 4 players and goes for about 120 minutes. It’s an Agricolaesque game of building up a medieval monastery. Ora et Labore means pray and work. To quote Boardgame geek:

In Ora et Labora, each player is head of a monastery in the Medieval era who acquires land and constructs buildings – little enterprises that will gain resources and profit. The goal is to build a working infrastructure and manufacture prestigious items – such as books, ceramics, ornaments, and relics – to gain the most victory points at the end of the game.

Ora et Labora, Uwe Rosenberg’s fifth “big” game, has game play mechanisms similar to his Le Havre, such as two-sided resource tiles that can be upgraded from a basic item to something more useful. Instead of adding resources to the board turn by turn as in Agricola and Le Havre, Ora et Labora uses a numbered rondel to show how many of each resource is available at any time. At the beginning of each round, players turn the roundel by one segment, adjusting the counts of all resources at the same time.