Napoleon-Columbia Games-A block game.

Three of us have been giving Napoleon from Columbia Games a go. It’s a block game. Instead of counters one plays with 4-sided blocks which allows units to deplete step by step as they take casualties. The latest revised version was played. Boardgamegeek sums up the Historical scenario: “On June 18, 1815, one of the most decisive battles in military history was fought in Belgian fields twenty miles southeast of Brussels. Within a short 100 days, Napoleon, former emperor of France, had returned from exile on the island of Elba, again seized power, quickly assembled an army, and marched to defeat the dispersed British and Prussian armies now preparing to invade France.

Napoleon invaded Belgium on June 15th, defeated the Prussians at the Battle of Ligny on the 16th and after a day of pursuit, faced the British and Dutch army commanded by Wellington. Aided by superb defensive tactics and the timely arrival of Prussian reinforcements, Wellington defeated the French in the great Battle of Waterloo, ending forever the military ambitions of the great Napoleon.”

We enjoyed the game as operational and grand tactical play is allowed. Unfortunately Napoleon lost all three games.

napoleon 2 napoleon

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Texas Glory-A block game by Columbia games

Columbia games publishes a series of block games. Texas Glory is one of these. Bernie and Andy tried it out last week. To quote Boardgamegeek : the campaigns for Texas Independence were much more than just the Alamo. Texas Glory includes the preliminary 1835 clashes when the Texans under Austin expelled the Mexican garrison from San Antonio de Bejar. It then covers Santa Anna’s 1836 surprise late winter campaign that began with his recapture of the Alamo, but ended with Texan victory at the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21,1836.

This fast-playing game reflects the balanced struggle between the Mexicans and the Texans. Sam Houston must delay superior Mexican forces until he can gather enough troops to risk a battle. The Mexicans must sweep across Texas with utmost speed because time and supply are their enemies. The significant role of “American Volunteers” in the eventual outcome becomes clear